I have to make sure they do it my way. He's already done his first TV spot, too. Karen goes to get lunch and maybe does some shopping or errands. On Sunday, Oct. 16, it will be one year since the 21-year-old LeGrand played his last football game, made his last tackle. The art work on the living room wall, BELIEVE. A day in the life of Eric LeGrand is, in a word, busy. LeGrand fractured his C-3 and C-4 vertebrae and, that night, underwent nine hours of emergency surgery to stabilize his spine. The standout defensive tackle became paralyzed from the neck down with a 0-5% chance of regaining neurological function according to his doctors. He’s breathing without a ventilator, something doctors had told his mother would be unlikely. He’ll even do it to one his physical therapists now and again. In the two-bedroom apartment where he and his mother, Karen LeGrand, live in Woodbridge, about a mile away from the home where he grew up in Avenel — which is being rebuilt to accommodate him — there is a wood carving of BELIEVE on the TV stand. Rehab wraps up a few minutes early because LeGrand needs some adjustments to his chair and before he goes home for class, he has to stop by Rutgers to receive an award from a church group from Brooklyn. Eric LeGrand believes he will walk again. However, when he tried to move his legs with no success, he realized the seriousness of his injury. "I love barbecued hamburgers," he says. That was a life-changer. It's well into the six figures already. And that he did. He does analysis during pregame, postgame and halftime of Rutgers radio broadcasts. ERIC is a self-service unemployment compensation tax system. With the electrodes in place, his hands are strapped to a hand bike and once the current gets flowing, Eric can start cranking until the spasms -- a frequent side effect -- kick in, his muscles tighten and he needs to stop. Right now Eric is my main concern.". Winds light and variable. Karen was worried sick that her big baby boy was wasting away. His face strains from the effort. In early 2011, he had recovered sensation all over his body and could move his shoulders. Because of his injuries Eric always feels cold, so on a fall day when the temperature is touching 80 degrees and the sun is shining brightly, he rolls out of the apartment and into the parking lot of the subdivision to bake in the rays. Eric sits, bent at the hip in his chair with his arms crooked and his forearms resting on the table, palms down. Now, LeGrand can move his arms and shoulders. He's got an itch. LeGrand’s appearance at the Hale Center, Rutgers’ athletic facility, draws a small crowd. Eric LeGrand believes he will walk again. Karen says she’ll put some hamburgers on the grill and to Eric, it’s the best news he’s heard all day. The only thing the LeGrands have closed their minds to is negativity. Again, big smile. Karen declines an offer to help strap in the chair. He has sensation in his body since the injury and can shrug his shoulders, but he has been unable to move his arms or legs since being hurt. "I love the way the players treat him. His former teammates stop to chat and make plans. While there has been great progress in treating spinal cord injury patients, it is still almost impossible to predict recovery. He uses electrodes to stimulate his pectoral muscles to move the arm toward his body, then tells LeGrand to hold it there for 30 seconds. Again, big smile. Between insurance she pays for, Rutgers' insurance and the NCAA's insurance, Eric's medical bills and all his equipment are covered for now. Karen feeds Eric a grilled chicken sandwich and even before he’s done he starts asking about cookies. "He’s going to be fine. Eric says when he gets better, "I'm definitely going on five or six vacations. Because of his injuries Eric always feels cold, so on a fall day when the temperature is touching 80 degrees and the sun is shining brightly, he rolls out of the apartment and into the parking lot of the subdivision to bake in the rays. Angry people are negative people and there is no place for negativity in the LeGrand home. throughout his body, although he was still unable to walk years later. "She gives me like one cookie every other day," he says. "If I can’t trust them to take care of him properly, I can’t leave him with them.". LeGrand previously said he has been able to move his arm to the side. He hangs out with his friends and his girlfriend. He spent five months as a patient at Kessler Institute in West Orange, N.J., where he saw people with spinal cord injuries who could not even eat. Christensen Arms … But he needs to keep his weight under 242 to be able to do certain rehabilitation exercises involving treadmills and harnesses. He can't scratch it because he is paralyzed below the shoulders. Eric says when he gets better, "I’m definitely going on five or six vacations. In the early days after his injury, Karen LeGrand and an aide would lift him out of the chair together, but now they can move him to his bed, his bathroom or his therapy table using a system of tracks running along the ceiling. Winds light and variable.. A few clouds. "The neat thing is he’s still E," coach Greg Schiano says. Karen and Eric aren't naive. But he needs to keep his weight under 242 to be able to do certain rehabilitation exercises involving treadmills and harnesses. After about 30 minutes on the bike, he moves over to another station to do some weight training — again with the help of the electrodes. His former teammates stop to chat and make plans. I think that’s why he likes being around the team.". He’s got a similar bike at home, on which he can also work out his legs, with the help of those electrodes. "We'll have to deal with that when it happens. His arms are put in straps and held up to about shoulder level, weights keeping them in place. It takes Karen LeGrand, with the help of a nurse and a nurse’s aide, about two hours to get Eric out of bed, dressed and into the $40,000 wheelchair that Eric adroitly controls with a mouthpiece. But when no one is close enough, he just makes that face. He does analysis during pregame, postgame and halftime of Rutgers radio broadcasts. With the electrodes in place, his hands are strapped to a hand bike and once the current gets flowing, Eric can start cranking until the spasms — a frequent side effect — kick in, his muscles tighten and he needs to stop. If his mom was close by, he'd rub his face against her chest, shoulder or arm. In 2011, after months of intensive therapy at the renowned Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation, Eric was weaned […] "She gives me like one cookie every other day," he says. Karen needs to get Eric home in time for class and to cook dinner. "I love barbecued hamburgers," he says. After a successful high school career in his home state of New Jersey, LeGrand chose to stay close to home by enrolling in Rutgers University. Don't miss the big stories. Partly cloudy. I have to be able to trust the people taking care of him before I can leave them with him. After five months at Kessler, Karen figures she knows just as much as any caregiver about the proper way to take care for her son. When they get to Kessler, a passer-by does a double-take as he walks by the minivan, stops, turns back and leans into the open door. The parents of some of LeGrand's high school friends started the Eric LeGrand Patriot Saint Foundation. He's often asked to speak at schools and churches, to talk about overcoming adversity by staying positive, never giving up hope, believing in God and yourself. If his mom was close by, he’d rub his face against her chest, shoulder or arm. To understand why, you must see his daily grind through his eyes. Welcome to the Employer Resource Information Center (ERIC). Henry Repeating Arms is the leading lever-action firearms manufacturer in the USA. WOODBRIDGE, N.J. -- Eric LeGrand makes this face sometimes. Karen goes to get lunch and maybe does some shopping or errands. His physical therapists attache electrodes to his back, chest, biceps and triceps. Now he's an outpatient there, rehabbing three days a week. LeGrand used to be able to bench press more than 400 pounds, but this workout is as tough as any he’s ever done. He then he pushes down a few inches. At rehab, Eric LeGrand can move his arms. They understand that the road ahead will not be easy. The only thing the LeGrands have closed their minds to is negativity. Like us on Facebook. When he opened his eyes, he was facing a fence with his hands shielding his face. Everything can change in the blink of an eye. To Eric, it is not matter of if he walks again, but rather when. His physical therapists attache electrodes to his back, chest, biceps and triceps. His physical therapists attache electrodes to his back, chest, biceps and triceps. His arms are put in straps and held up to about shoulder level, weights keeping them in place. New York Jets linebacker Bart Scott also set up Can'tWait57.com to sell T-shirts to help raise money. He does that with his girlfriend, too. He’s going to walk and he’s going to do great things. LeGrand was credited with the tackle, but he lay on the ground for several minutes before being carted off, unable to move anything but his head and unable to breathe. Eric sits, bent at the hip in his chair with his arms crooked and his forearms resting on the table, palms down. Karen LeGrand worked for 20 years as an import/export specialist. Just like she used to do when Eric was little, and he'd be out playing from morning until sundown, Karen has to call her son in to eat and hope that he's close enough to hear. On a kickoff to Army, LeGrand unintentionally put his head down while running and ended up driving the crown of his head into the shoulder of the ball carrier, Malcolm Brown. He does several sets of side-to-side movements, a few minutes each. Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device. Eric's goal is to someday walk again and his progress has reached the point where he can stand with the help of special medical equipment. But after his injury, LeGrand's appetite went away and his weight dwindled to 196 pounds. LeGrand has since finished his degree, published a book (Believe the Victorious Story of Eric LeGrand), worked as a sports analyst and motivational speaker, and is now trying his hand as a coffee shop owner. Done with lunch, Eric heads to the minivan and backs himself in perfectly. Within a year of his injury, he began to use his arms again, and could stand with the help of a metal frame. Burgers, barbecue, baked ziti -- his grandma’s is best, though his mom’s will do -- cookies and cake. Done with lunch, Eric heads to the minivan and backs himself in perfectly. It’s well into the six figures already. But after his injury, LeGrand’s appetite went away and his weight dwindled to 196 pounds. "We kind of go in with open minds.". They treat him like the same guy. Now he’s an outpatient there, rehabbing three days a week. In the two-bedroom apartment where he and his mother, Karen LeGrand, live in Woodbridge, about a mile away from the home where he grew up in Avenel -- which is being rebuilt to accommodate him -- there is a wood carving of BELIEVE on the TV stand. Low 44F. He completed the video call with Newsweek by using video equipment in a room decorated with sports memorabilia, including his framed No. "When I get better, I’m going to move to Florida," he said. In January 2021, Eric officially created his own coffee brand, LeGrand Coffee House. WHERE IS Eric LeGrand? When you try to move, there's 1,000 pounds on you and you can't move it." The electrical charges take the place of the ones that can’t get from his brain to his muscles because of the injury to his spinal cord. When you try to move, there's 1,000 pounds on you and you can't move it." "One thing I'm going to do when I get better, I'm going to go back out to the Giants' field. "’, Eric LeGrand Believe Fund: http://www.scarletknights.com/believe/, Eric LeGrand Patriot Saint Foundation: http://www.ericlegrandpatriotsaintfoundation.com/, Follow Ralph D. Russo at http://Twitter.com/ralphdrussoAP.